An odour Attribution Study to determine the relative contribution from three facilities for the development of real-time odour monitoring

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48 006a   An Odour Attribution Study is undertaken in North America for an Air Quality Management Agency that includes athering data from specific sources and ambient locations to better understand odour impacts within the local communities. Specifically, the following objectives were to be met:

  Identify odorant compounds impacting the area of concern via comprehensive quantitative and qualitative analyses; Determine the relative contribution and variability of the odorant compounds emitted from the three key source facilities; Develop a strategy for continuous real-time odorant monitoring to measure emissions impacting the community from the three key source facilities.

Drone-based environmental odour monitoring: SNIFFDRONE

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   Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) produce gaseous emissions that might be olfactory annoying to the surrounding population. Current odour assessment methodologies are based on costly and infrequent olfactometry measurements involving human panels, and continuous monitoring of few gases via fixed gas detectors installed on the plant.

   This leads to odour measurements with low temporal and spatial resolution, hindering an accurate characterization of the odour episodes. The main goal of the SNIFFDRONE project, presented in this paper, is to develop a drone with olfaction capabilities to acquire spatially-dense odour measurements and localize the source of odour nuisances in WWTPs.

The odour impact of broiler chickens – comparison of the theoretical approach with field panel measurements according to EN16841-2

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42 003    In the Flemish legislation, no odour assessment framework is implemented, despite that odour-related permit applications require the inclusion of an odour impact study. For livestock farming, odour emission factors, derived from olfactometric measurements (ouE), are widely used. Contrastingly, the available assessment tools, based on earlier odour impact research, utilize sniffing measurements (se).

   To allow comparison between the two units of odour, it is assumed that 1 ouE equals 1 se. For most groups of livestock animals with a rather constant growth cycle (e.g. pigs), this comparison is deemed valid and suitable for evaluating the odour impact. However, the theoretical assessment of broiler chicken emissions can be questioned, as the olfactometric emission factor of 0.33 ouE/s.animal results in almost no odour impact.

 

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