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Development of personal Electronic Nose for Smartphones for the Measurement of Odours in the Environment

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Lozano 00

 

   A new miniaturized electronic nose (60x60 mm) connected to a smartphone through Bluetooth connection that was presented in this conference has an electronic design similar to other prototypes, but with a smaller size and consumption. The control of the system is based on a microcontroller PIC18F46K80. It includes four miniaturized MOX sensors and an integrated sensor of ambient temperature and humidity with suitable conditioning circuits.

   Communications with the smartphone are made using a Low Power Bluetooth Transmitter. An Android application has also been developed to connect to the device and to monitor the measurements. Data processing is performed remotely on a server by sending a request to it and subsequently receiving the output value of a classifier based on neural networks or fuzzy logic calculated on the server.

Jesús Lozano1*, Patricia Arroyo1, José Ignacio Suárez1, José Luis Herrero1, José Pedro Santos2, Manuel Aleixandre2

1 Escuela de Ingenierías industriales. Universidad de Extremadura, Av. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz, Spain.
2 GRIDSEN Instituto de Tecnologías Físicas y de la Información (ITEFI-CSIC), Serrano 144, 28006 Madrid, Spain.
*

Thomas Hübert is not with us anymore

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thomas hubert
   Yesterday, we were informed by the CEN that the 15th on November 2017 Dr. Thomas Hübert passed away after a very short illness. Dr. Thomas Hübert worked at the Federal Institute of Materials Research and Testing (BAM) and he was member of several groups dealing with instrumental odour monitoring such as the Working Group (WG) 41 of the Technical Committee 264 of the CEN.

   Dr. Hübert was activily involved in the WG41 and he was also the coordinator of the German mirror group. The picture on the left was taken in Berlin in August last year, during the last meeting of the WG. Dr. Hübert (in the middle) was a very active person and he took part on many decisions of this group. It is a great loss for his family and friends and also for the "odour" family.

Calibration of o-sensors? Is that possible? Some inputs from the last meeting in Berlin

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wg41 berlin meeting  Two points of view. Two ways of seeing calibration of Instrument Odour Monitors (in short here, o-sensors). The 29th and 30th of August, the Working Group (WG) 41 committed to the new standard on o-sensors, met in Berlin, Germany to discuss a bit more about the text. This time, there were some very hot discussions on the interesting issue of o-sensor calibration. The tense atmosphere was broken from time to time by the pause for coffees, but all in all, everybody was enjoying the fascinating discussions being hold in the meeting room of the Institute for Materials Research and Testing in Berlin.

   Like in tennis matches, the ball went from one side to the other side of the court. The question is the following: Could a non-specific o-sensor be used on any application? That is, could an o-sensor that is performing fine in a composting site, be used also in an oil refinery? In that case, is there any way to prove that the quality of the results is transferable? should we define procedures to calibrate o-sensors on site? Which is the Certified Reference Material (CRM) to calibrate the o-sensor? is it possible to design a CRM for quality procedures? These and more questions were addressed during these 2-day meetings.

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